I have a fake author on my paper – what should I do?

I have a fake author on my paper – what should I do?

Young scientists often struggle with the problem that they are obliged to include authors in the author list who may not have contributed substantially – or not all. Especially partners who only provide technology, patient samples, genetically modified organisms or general infrastructure may be a reason for debate, although without their contribution, the research would be impossible. How can you handle this problem?

Should I publish negative results, or does this ruin my career?

Should I publish negative results, or does this ruin my career?

Scientists often produce negative results. All experiments were done correctly – but there was no difference between test and control. They get conflicting advice from supervisors and ethicists. Some say that publishing negative results is a waste of resources and ruins their scientific careers. Others say that ‘not publishing negative results is unethical’. What should young scientists do in such a situation?

16 very personal reasons not to commit scientific fraud

16 very personal reasons not to commit scientific fraud

We all know that scientific fraud is bad for science and society in general. However, apart from these general considerations it is necessary and effective to make young scientists aware of the fact that scientific misconduct ruins their personal integrity and destroys their careers. The following 16 personal reasons will convince most young scientists that scientific misconduct is a bad idea.

How to become a professor? A 10-step career guide!

How to become a professor? A 10-step career guide!

Being a professor is amazing: a lot of academic freedom to investigate and teach exciting subjects and a secure salary until retirement. However, obtaining this position can be pretty strenuous, and many young scientists do not know the requirements to qualify for such a position. In this article, I give you 10 essential parameters a selection committee will evaluate when selecting a new professor.

Emotional Phases of a Research Project: PhD and Postdoc Stress

Emotional Phases of a Research Project: PhD and Postdoc Stress

Stress is a rather typical aspect of most research projects because every research project has five characteristic emotional phases: You start with naïve enthusiasm, become competent and disillusioned, you want to give up (the stress phase, slump or dip), you recover, and finally, you round up and exit. How do you survive PhD stress and postdoc stress?

What is the best publication strategy in science?

What is the best publication strategy in science?

Young scientists often get conflicting advice on how they should publish. Every generation of young scientists has to address similar questions: Should I publish several smaller papers or should I focus on one big paper with a high impact factor? What is the effect of my publication strategy on my career and the possibility to raise grant money? How important is my publication list for a non-academic career?

What is a substantial contribution to a paper?

What is a substantial contribution to a paper?

To become an author on a scientific publication, you need to contribute substantially – but what does that mean? Are there clear criteria, or can this be debated? What about collaborators who only provide data or samples or medical writers who improve the English of the paper? What about ChatGPT and other text generators?